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How to Get a Life

December 13, 2018 | Anneliese Wahlman

In case you didn’t catch the story, recently, a group of guys from a YouTube channel called Yes Theory, a channel created by four friends who spend their time doing crazy feats and documenting their experiences, challenged actor Will Smith to bungee jump from a helicopter over the Grand Canyon.

The reason for such a crazy and dangerous idea, or for any of the activities documented on Yes Theory? In the words of the YouTubers, “Life can be as fulfilling and authentic as you wish so long as you’re willing to seek discomfort.” Basically, growth and good things lie on the other side of your fears. So, if it’s uncomfortable, that could be evidence of a positive outcome.

Smith’s personal life philosophy resonates with the whole idea of Yes Theory, so he accepted the challenge, planning to jump on his fiftieth birthday. He explained that he doesn’t like being afraid—he’s scared of being scared. Whenever something comes up that makes him afraid, he makes a point of “attacking” that fear. …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

When You Need to Know God’s Will but You’re Scared of Making the Wrong Choice

November 15, 2018 | Anneliese Wahlman

For my eighteenth birthday, my mom gave me a card that read, “I used to live each day as though it were my last. But people got tired of hearing me scream, ‘I’M GONNA DIE!!! I’M GONNA DIE!!!’ Hope your birthday’s a scream.” Funnily enough, that pretty much described the stress I was just beginning to feel as I reached the big 1-8. I was sad and scared and anxious because I suddenly realized that I wasn’t going to be in high school the next year and I was the one in charge of figuring out what I would be doing instead. And this role…

Freaked. Me. Out.

I didn’t know what God’s will was and I was scared of making a decision. Actually, for years, asking about God’s will made me want to curl up in the fetal position and eat refined sugar. What if I did the wrong thing? How was I supposed to know what the right thing was? How could I move forward when I didn’t …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

My Battle Standard

October 17, 2018 | Karl Lindsay

If you were to walk into my office, one of the first things you would see as you enter is the large flag that hangs on my wall. My flag travels with me when I move to a new place or achieve something significant. I have a photo somewhere of me flying it at the top of Mount Kenya in Africa. Now that I live in Oregon, USA, I proudly hang my Australian flag in my office to be seen every day. It serves as a reminder to me, and to those who visit, that I was born and raised under the Southern Cross, a cross-shaped constellation visible in the Southern Hemisphere’s night skies and prominent on our flag.

At home in Australia, if you were to walk into my parents’ home office, you may notice the Lindsay family crest hanging on a small shield on the left. I have one of those too, in the form of a rubber stamp for the books in my library. I even have …
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Karl Lindsay

Administrator
ARISE

Enmity in the Air

October 5, 2018 | Ty Gibson

One time when I was in the fifth grade a fight broke out during recess. All the kids were gathered around yelling as two boys were punching and kicking one another. What I remember most is feeling nervous and sick to my stomach. That’s what the world looks like right now—a schoolyard fight—but on a much larger and more brutal scale. And that same nervousness and nausea I felt back then sometimes floods my body as I watch the national and international events of each day unfold.

One of the words the Bible uses to describe the fallen human condition is “enmity” (Genesis 3:15; Romans 8:5-7). At its deepest, darkest core, sin is enmity against God and others. Apart from the subduing effect of God’s grace upon our hearts, we humans are in constant internal turmoil that boils over into hostility toward some chosen enemy. There is a deep-seated psychology to our enmity: we suppress and evade our own guilt by blaming, accusing, and hating others (Romans 2:1-4). The practice …
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Ty Gibson

Co-Director
Light Bearers

What A.A. Taught Me About Church

September 14, 2018 | Anneliese Wahlman

Note: some names and minor details in this post have been changed to protect privacy.

Lots of people complain about millennials: we’re shallow, entitled, lazy, we don’t know how to do anything useful. We’re pretty much the equivalent of a generational menstrual cramp for the human race, from which recovery is doubtful. (Cue “The problem with young people these days” speech.) Within the church, people are especially freaking out about the fact that these young people seem to be leaving faster than we can bribe them with a latte.

I’m a millennial and, yeah, I’m lazy. And there are definitely lots of practical things I don’t know how to do. (Sometimes I wonder if this whole adulting thing is gonna work out longterm.) But when it comes to church, I feel like a bit of an outlier. I’ve attended church all my life. I grew up knowing that I should have a relationship with Jesus and bring people into the church. I heard Scripture-based sermons and marked prooftext studies in …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

3,500 Light Years Away

August 3, 2018 | Light Bearers

On June 15 of this year, Cambridge University scientist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018) was buried between Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin. A physicist and cosmologist of the highest rank, Hawking is believed to be the greatest scientist of his generation.

As his ashes were lowered into the ground, a recording of his voice was beamed 3,500 light years away toward the nearest black hole in the universe. It symbolically commemorated Hawking’s life-long desire to reach outer space and penetrate the unknown.

In some sense we all long to be heard.

Hawking was heard all over the world, yet he needed the universe to know his voice. Though an atheist, he wanted to reach beyond the stars, whether or not something—or Someone—was listening.

Yet there is Someone listening. Maybe we can’t beam our voices into a black hole, yet the lowliest among us has the privilege of knowing our faintest whisper can reach beyond the known universe and into the very presence of God. It’s a baffling reality.

…he wanted to reach …
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Light Bearers

a publishing, training and evangelism ministry.

Honest Gabe

July 19, 2018 | Anneliese Wahlman

The best policy

I’m not a parent, but from watching my sister Catie and her kids, it seems to me that it is a truth universally acknowledged that a mother trying to maintain a semblance of control is in want of a child who will keep her honest.

Enter my nephew Gabriel.

Gabe is six years old and growing up quickly. He proudly showed me his teeth—or lack of them—the other day over FaceTime. It’s hard for me not to feel happy around him, especially when he tells me that my mouth looks like the Amazon logo when I laugh.

The world is shiny and new, simple and golden for Gabe. Maybe that’s why he’s so fun to talk to. Or maybe it’s because, like most kids, he’s rich in the currency of total transparency. He just says stuff how it is, and there’s no reason to pretend you are something you aren’t. There is something renewing to the human spirit when you hang out with someone so very authentic, …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

A Channel of Light

April 6, 2018 | James Rafferty

As I moved through our publishing house today, checking the inventory, I felt a sense of urgency to get literature out the door. Things are changing. The world is changing. The ability to send gospel-filled containers around the world is changing.

Great changes often happen quickly and without notice. In Christ’s time, John was preaching in the wilderness, pointing people to Jesus. The next thing we know, he’s being persecuted by civil authority for opposing immoral lifestyles. Does that sound familiar?

Today, we in America still have a good amount of freedom compared to some other nations where gospel literature is forbidden. We can still be like John, who bore “witness of the Light, that all through him might believe. He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light. That was the true Light which gives light to every man coming into the world” (John 1:7-8).

That’s what we’ve always believed about Light Bearers. We are a channel of light. Or, as John says, we …
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James Rafferty

Co-Director
Light Bearers

From Here, We Can Go Anywhere

February 21, 2018 | Anneliese Wahlman

We all have a moral compass that guides us. It keeps us from punching the people who upset us and lets us know we need to apologize for telling our sister she’s fat. But we also experience a sort of silly guilt for things that aren’t really moral issues but make us feel bad for one reason or another.

My older sister Catie will make herself eat the end piece of a loaf of bread simply because she doesn’t want it to be neglected (or wasted, either). I also have a friend who, when she and her husband are driving, makes him pull over if she sees any small creatures crossing the road. Then, like a guardian angel, she gets out and gently picks up whatever the creature is and moves it across the road to safety.

Unfortunately, I don’t feel bad for not helping bugs cross the street. However, I do feel slight twinges of silly guilt when I look at my reading list and see all the books …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers

When the Wedding Is Over

February 13, 2018 | Anneliese Wahlman

To some of us, they were Aunty Carol and Uncle Dave. She was small like a bird and sweet as honey. He was tall, practical, and kept a hundred stories tucked away in his pockets to share with the students assigned to him during the work period. They lived up the road from the girls dorm, and on some Saturday afternoons my friends and I would go to the big white house on the hill to visit Mr. and Mrs. Meservia.

Though he was of retirement age, Uncle Dave still worked as head of the maintenance department when I was in high school. He eased away some of our work time by giving us advice or telling us of his adventures while serving in the Canadian Navy, like the time he got to dine with the Queen of England’s mother.

Aunty’s health was bad, so she mostly stayed home. But she didn’t complain. She was always surrounded by a steady peace, like there was an anchor somewhere deep inside her, …
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Anneliese Wahlman

Editorial Intern
Light Bearers